AncestryDNA Updates Matching

 
FB AncestryDNA Updates to Matching Copy.jpg

Here’s what I like about AncestryDNA’s updates to your DNA matching experience.

AncestryDNA Updates to Matching

Change is afoot at AncestryDNA. Again. 

While “stability” and “predictability” seem like honorable qualities in a company or product, when it comes to tech tools, those words sound more like “dated” and “old.” Of course, we are used to this by now—and the problems these updates can bring. (I had a client tell me recently that he wanted to be in touch sooner, but his grandson “upgraded” his computer to Windows 10 and then promptly left for college the next day, leaving him fighting with a new interface and operating system.)

The good news is, you won’t have this problem with Ancestry’s new update. There aren’t any changes to the interface or the layout of the information. In fact, many of you will not even notice at first that your match list has changed.

But in fact, there likely have been some adjustments made, as we see below: 

  • Some of your third cousins have been demoted to fourth cousins. 

  • Some of your fourth cousins have been demoted to 5th-8th cousins.  

  • Some of your distant cousins have disappeared off your match list 

  • You have new cousins on your distant cousin match list.

In general, from what Ancestry has showed us, you gain more than you lose. 

Why these changes in AncestryDNA matches matter

Changes in the dregs of your match list may not seem like that big of a deal, so why am I telling you about it? Probably because I am a nerd, and I like cool science stuff, so I think you should too. 

You see, Ancestry has made some big changes in the way that they are calculating matches. They are getting better at it. Which means you match list is now more representative of your ancestral connections, even at the very distant level. 

There are two big pieces to this matching puzzle that Ancestry has tinkered with in this latest update: phasing and matching. 

You will remember our discussion on DNA phasing and how it can impact your matching. Ancestry has developed a robust reference database of phased DNA in order to better phase our samples. Basically, they have looked through their database at parent child duos and trios and noted that certain strings of DNA values often travel together. Its like they have noticed that our DNA says “A black cat scared the mouse” instead of  “The brown cat ate the mouse” and they can then recognize that phrase in our DNA, which in turn helps our DNA tell the true story of our heritage. 

In addition to updating the phasing, Ancestry has revamped their matching method. In the past they viewed our DNA in small windows of information, and then stitched those windows together to try to get a better picture of what our DNA looked like. Now instead they have turned to a point-by-point analysis of our DNA. Again to use a sentence example, with the window analysis we may have the following sentence windows: 

ack and J 

ill went t 

he hill t 

etch a pai 

l of water. 

Of those various possible windows, you may share the “etch a pai” with another individual in the database, earning that cousin a spot on your match page. However, the truth is, that bit could say “sketch a painting” or “stretch a painful leg” or “fetch a pail.” With Ancestry’s new method, they are able to see farther on either side of the matching segment, making this clearly “fetch a pail.” That means better matching, which means more confidence in your cousin matches. 

The downside to this update is going to come in the reorganization of some of your relationships. Ancestry has tightened their genetic definition of your third and fourth cousins. Basically, that means that some of your true 3rd cousins are going to show up as 4th cousins, and some of your true 4th cousins are going to be shifted down into the abyss of 5th-8th cousins.

What is really upsetting about this is what this does to the Shared Matches tool. The shared matches tool allows you to gather matches in the database that are related to you and one other person, provided you are all related at the 4th cousin level or higher. This tightening of the belt on 4th cousins means that some of them are going to drop through the cracks of that tool, really limiting its ability. Grr. Hopefully Ancestry will fix that, and expand this tool to include all of your matches. They have their fairly good reasons for this, but still….

So, as the winds of change blow yet another iteration of the AncestryDNA match page, I think we can see this as an overall win for doing genealogy with our genetics at Ancestry. 

Ready to REALLY work those AncestryDNA test results? Grab my Understanding AncestryDNA quick reference guide. You’ll learn how to link your tree to your DNA results; explore your DNA circles; navigate your New Ancestry Discoveries; explore your hints and exhaust other search tools.

Originally published May 2016 on genealogygems.com.