Top DNA News of 2017

 

This year-in-review for DNA news of 2017 catches amazing highlights from leading companies Ancestry, MyHeritage, Living DNA, Family Tree DNA and 23andMe.

DNA testing numbers grow

As evidence of its now proven usefulness in genealogy research, the genetic genealogy industry is growing at a fast pace. Ancestry.com has amassed the largest database, now boasting over 6 million people tested, and is growing at breakneck speeds, having doubled the size of its database in 2017.  

DNA health and culture studies

As the databases grow larger and our genealogy finds become more frequent, we can’t ignore that this kind of data, the correlated genetic and genealogical data, amassed by these companies, has great value. In November, MyHeritage announced an effort by their scientific team to “study the relationship between genetics and behavior, personal characteristics, and culture.”

These studies are not new, as 23andMe is in open hot pursuit of the connections between genetics and our health, and always has been. All of our genetic genealogy companies are involved in research on one level or another and every person who swabs or spits has the opportunity to participate in other research projects (read up on the consent policies at each company).  At the time of testing, you have the option to opt in or out of this research, and the ability to alter that decision at any time after you test, by accessing your settings. According to an article in Fast Company, it seems we as a community are very interested in helping with research as 23andMe reports an over 80% opt-in-to-research rate among their customers.  

All our genetic genealogy companies realize that you might want to do more with your data than just look for your ancestors. This year Family Tree DNA has partnered with Vitagene in an effort to provide insight into your health via your genetic genealogy test results. Of course 23andMe is the leader in health testing when we look at our top genetic genealogy companies. This year 23andMe finally succeeded in passing several of their health tests through the FDA, a huge leap forward in their efforts to provide health testing directly to consumers. 

Genetic communities

While health testing has certainly seen an explosion of interest this year, it is not the only way that our companies are using the data they have amassed. AncestryDNA took the DNA and pedigree charts of 2 million customers who consented to research and using some really fancy science, were able to provide amazing insight into our recent ancestral past with the creation of their genetic communities. These genetic communities enhance our understanding of our heritage by showing us where our ancestors may have been between 1750 and 1850, the genealogical sweet spot that most of us are trying to fill in. 

FTDNA won’t sell your DNA

And I’ve got some breaking news for you: Family Tree DNA just started a consumer awareness campaign to reinforce the message that they will never sell your genetic data. That’s worth talking about it more detail, but for now, I just wanted you to see the news.

A new One World Tree

Living DNA, a relative newcomer to the genetic genealogy arena, announced in October of 2017 their intention to use their database to help create a One World Family Tree. To do so, they are collecting DNA samples from all over the world, specifically those who four grandparents lived in close proximity to each other. Along with this announcement, Living DNA is allowing individuals who have results from other companies to transfer into their database.  

So it seems that with growing databases come growing options, weather to opt-in to research, to pursue health information from your DNA test results, or to help build global databases for health or genealogy purposes. Recognizing the growing appeal to non-genealogists as well, AncestryDNA added to their list of options the ability to opt-out of the match page, and there are rumors that LivingDNA will soon be adding the option to opt-in to matching (they do not currently have a cousin-matching feature as part of their offering).

It can be tricky to keep up with all that goes on. Follow me on Facebook to stay up to date with genetic genealogy news that matters—and commentary that helps you make sense of it all.

This article contains affiliate links. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, Your DNA Guide will receive a small payment, which does not affect the price you pay but which does help Your DNA Guide continue to bring you great articles like these!

Originally published on genealogygems.com.