R1b Haplogroup | R1a Haplogroup

Jayne Ekins

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What is the R1b haplogroup? Learn about its relationship to the R1a Y-DNA haplogroup and its geographic relationship to Western Europe. See our chart of the best DNA tests for YDNA haplogroups.

R1b haplogroup Y-DNA IO.pngThe R1b haplogroup. Have you heard of it? It’s the most commonly represented Y-chromosome haplogroup in Western Europe. What about R1a; is it related to R1b? And what’s a Y-chromosome haplogroup in the first place? Let’s take a look.

Y-chromosome haplogroups

The Y-chromosome has something to say about a pretty narrow niche of your genealogy (your paternal line), but it does this incredibly well. Most of our other DNA recombines every generation, which means each pair of chromosomes shuffles together in a unique mashup to make a new human. Today we have some pretty intense statistical processes and algorithms that go into untangling that jumbled up autosomal DNA. But the Y-chromosome is slick, passing from father to son mostly unchanged.

Certain kinds of Y-DNA markers are suited to detecting recent paternal relationships, from immediate family through distant identifiable cousins. Y-chromosome SNPs, on the other hand, are a type of DNA marker that traces deep ancestry. These single-base-pair points are scattered throughout the genome, having mutated from their original form only once a long time ago.

Figure 1. A SNP is a single-base-pair mutation that happened once in history.

Figure 1. A SNP is a single-base-pair mutation that happened once in history.

When you do a SNP scan on the Y-chromosome of any male on the planet, they will have in their DNA the collection of SNPs that occurred in their predecessors over time, all the way back through their most ancient paternal ancestors.

Figure 2. Descendants accumulate the Y-SNP mutations of all their paternal ancestors.

Figure 2. Descendants accumulate the Y-SNP mutations of all their paternal ancestors.

A Y-chromosome haplogroup is what researchers call the grouping of people that share the same accumulated set of SNP mutations. People belong to different haplogroups depending on the combination of SNPs that they have.

Figure 3. Different haplogroups have different collections of Y-SNPs. People belonging to the same haplogroup share the same accumulated SNP mutations.

Figure 3. Different haplogroups have different collections of Y-SNPs. People belonging to the same haplogroup share the same accumulated SNP mutations.

There are 20 major haplogroups, designated with the letters A through T, that have been identified among living people in the world today. Haplogroups tend to be linked to certain ethnicities and geographies.

Each of the major haplogroups, designated by a capital letter A through T, is divided up many times over into subgroups that are more specific, sometimes to a tighter geography or narrower ethnic circle. Subgroups are labeled by a suffix that can be quite long, with alternating numbers and lower-case letters, like this:

“R1b1a1b1a”

Each of the 8 numbers/letters after R represents a more specific grouping of people that becomes more discerning at each level. There are many millions (billions?) of people in haplogroup R, but at the level of the last ‘letter a’ on the end there are far fewer in comparison.

Fig 4. Major haplogroups have many subhaplogroups that contain fewer people, and can become more geographically or ethnically distinctive at each level.

Fig 4. Major haplogroups have many subhaplogroups that contain fewer people, and can become more geographically or ethnically distinctive at each level.

Even as these sub-haplogroups get more specific, it’s important to remember that they still stem from Y-SNP mutations that happened thousands of years ago. So if you learn your SNP group to the highest level detail possible, and meet another person that matches it perfectly, this often doesn’t say much about how your recent ancestry connects. You may find that you have paternal-line ancestors from a similar geography, but this Y-SNP finding alone would not typically suggest that you are genealogically recent cousins.

You can, however, learn much about how your haplogroup intersects with ancient history because many have been studied extensively.

R Haplogroup: R1a and R1b

Haplogroup R fits into a big beautiful tree of the human family:

Figure 5. Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree 2021

Figure 5. Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree 2021

Family Tree DNA hosts a commercial clearinghouse for discovering and cataloging Y-SNPs, and as of July 2021 they report 45,891 branches, limbs, and twigs that stem off from the root of this ancient tree. Quite a lot of detail we can’t show here, right?! ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy) meticulously manages the central Y-SNP database that defines this tree, placing known and newly discovered SNPs into their home branch or twig. Approaching 93,000 SNPs make up the backbone of this tree, with new variants and mutations found among the peoples of the world every year. Discovering new SNPs sometimes requires branches to be redefined as the age of the new SNP is sorted out relative to other mutations. Integrating all of this is no small undertaking, and research, commercial, and citizen scientist arms work together to collectively broaden our understanding. It takes a village to raise these Y-SNPs!

Haplogroup R is an upstanding member of the Y-DNA Haplogroup Tree. Today, members of Haplogroup R are numerous and widespread, found most commonly throughout Europe and South Asia. Scientists have traced the origins of all Y-DNA haplogroups to Africa, with groups branching off later as SNP mutations occurred in men of certain geographies. The predecessors of Haplogroup R migrated from Africa and across the Arabian peninsula, and up through the Eurasian Steppes where the defining SNP mutation, called M207, got its footing an estimated 27,000 years ago.

Figure 6. Ancient migration routes of Haplogroup R subbranches

Figure 6. Ancient migration routes of Haplogroup R subbranches

Descendants of that original Haplogroup R ancestor migrated, and accrued additional mutations that formed the major sub-branches we see today: R1a and R1b. From regions around the Caspian Sea, descendants of R1a moved west through Central Europe and into Scandinavia. R1b took a distinctive more southerly westward route and made its way to Western Europe and out to the British Isles. Haplogroup R2 also exists and initially migrated into South Asia. Today R2 descendants are found at the highest levels among the Burusho people of Pakistan.

You can view the different geographies where people trace their Y-haplogroup today using a frequency heat map. These show a focus of intensity where a haplogroup is found most frequently, with decreasing intensity in areas where it is less common. Phylogeographer is an enlightening online tool that allows you to see where else in the world people are commonly found with your haplogroup of interest.

R1b haplogroup in Western Europe

R1b is the most numerous branch in Western Europe today, with as many as 3 out of 5 males being a member of its prolific subbranch R-M269. Another well-recognized hotspot is also found east of the Baltic Sea, and then scattered low frequency in other far-flung areas in Asia and Africa.

Figure 7. Current day concentrations of people with R1b-M269 mutation. (Y heatmap developed by Hunter Provyn and Thomas Krahn and found at Phylogeographer.com. Used with permission.)

Figure 7. Current day concentrations of people with R1b-M269 mutation. (Y heatmap developed by Hunter Provyn and Thomas Krahn and found at Phylogeographer.com. Used with permission.)

R1a haplogroup in Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Southern India

Haplogroup R1a descended from the same common ancestor as R1b, but traveled and made home in very different areas of the world since branching. Its most widely found subbranch, called R-M417 today centers in Eastern Europe, and also in Central Asia and Southern India.

Figure 8. Current day concentrations of people with R1a-M417 mutation. (Y heatmap developed by Hunter Provyn and Thomas Krahn and found at Phylogeographer.com. Used with permission.)

Figure 8. Current day concentrations of people with R1a-M417 mutation. (Y heatmap developed by Hunter Provyn and Thomas Krahn and found at Phylogeographer.com. Used with permission.)

Does my haplogroup reveal recent ancestral places?

While there are places commonly associated with R1a and R1b, you may not necessarily be from one of those locations just because you share that haplogroup. Intrepid people from all haplogroups have traveled over time, and left their genes in diverse places on Earth. I have a friend from Milan who has documented multi-generational Italian heritage, but his Y-DNA haplogroup is not a common one for that area. In fact, he belongs to Haplogroup C, which today is focused in Far East Asia, Siberia, Australia and the Pacific Islands. Y-DNA haplogroups can give us fascinating insights into where our genes have migrated over time, but may not necessarily give us information relevant to our recent genealogies. (And remember, a Y-DNA haplogroup only sheds light on your paternal line—your father and his father and his father, etc.,—deep into history.)

The histories of R1a and R1b make for some compelling personal discovery. If you find yourself a member of R1a, you are in good company with Somerled of Argyll, one of Scotland’s greatest warriors. And R1b enthusiasts will be glad to know that Charles Darwin and Czar Nicolas II of Russia both belonged to this fruitful haplogroup.

DNA testing for Y haplogroups

If you haven’t started to work on your family’s Y-DNA, haplogroup testing is a great place to begin. Many companies offer this service, at varying levels of detail, but notably not AncestryDNA or MyHeritage. That said, when it comes to discovering your Y-haplogroup, you’ve got options!

  • Get your basic Y-DNA haplogroup with your standard 23andMe kit. They don’t report on the peripheral subbranches and twigs of the Y-DNA tree, but will get you started by placing you in one of the major groupings of the world.
  • Living DNA* tests about ten times the number of Y-SNPs as 23andMe, so this is a good option for those looking for that much more detail at the price of an autosomal test.

Family Tree DNA test kit cropped.jpg

  • When you’re ready for “high-res,” it’s time to check out Family Tree DNA. The Big Y-700 test will set you back $449 USD, but examines over 200,000 Y-SNPs—about 100 times as many as 23andMe. This will give you the highest level of haplogroup detail possible using sequencing technology. Family Tree DNA hosts the world’s largest Y-DNA database, allowing you to search for matches, find common surnames and countries that share your haplogroup, and join free genealogical research studies pertaining to your Y-chromosome. Clients considering Y-chromosome SNP or sequence testing should consider not only price, but access to a Y-chromosome database to interpret the report and search for matches. Family Tree DNA’s Y-chromosome database is the largest and most developed, which may offset the higher price for prospective customers.
  • Full Genomes also offers a Y-chromosome sequence with SNP interpretation at comparable price. This company is not to be confused with YFull, which hosts its own database offering Y-chromosome sequence upload, interpretation, and comparison where you can also learn your most detailed SNP grouping.
  • YSEQ brings the unique offering of a-la-carte haplogroup testing to the market where customers can take SNP tests targeted to a certain haplogroup or its subbranches. For instance, there are 12 different tests that a client could strategically choose from to learn their finest detail R1b haplogroup. YSEQ also offers a whole genome sequencing product, called WGS400, specifically designed for genealogy researchers. Customers receive a full sequence for the Y-chromosome, mtDNA, X-chromosome, and all autosomes at a lower price point than other sequencing tests that just provide Y-chromosome alone.

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And remember, if YOU don’t have a Y-chromosome, this rich information isn’t necessarily lost to your family. Persuade a father, brother, grandfather, paternal uncle or cousin to take the test. I find chocolate always works.

Explore Your Y-DNA Results: Haplogroups and More

Haplogroups are just the beginning of what Y-DNA test results can reveal about paternal ancestry. Check out our free Why the YDNA Mini-Course to consider what other ways YDNA can reveal more information about the male lines in your family tree. The Mini-Course is an excerpt from our YDNA for Genealogy Course, which takes a deeper dive into understanding Y-haplogroups, as well as other topics.

Join the free Mini-Course

 

 

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<a href="https://www.yourdnaguide.com/author/jayne-ekins" target="_self">Jayne Ekins</a>

Jayne Ekins

Jayne has been in the field of genetic genealogy since its beginnings as part of the Sorenson Molecular Genealogy Foundation. She has lectured throughout the United States and international venues on the applications of molecular biology to elucidating ancient and recent genealogical connections. She has authored and co-authored many peer-reviewed scientific publications, as well as general articles on genetic genealogy. It is a pleasure for her to see the accelerating developments in genetic genealogy, and the wide accessibility and application it has for the average human curious about their origins.

4 Comments

  1. Harold Jones

    The paragraph below Fugure 6 could easily be used to describe the migrations of the ancient “Hebrew” or “Israelite” tribes.
    The migration routes described are consistent with with the migration routes they took. Even the “out of Africa” migration route may be simply groups who had earlier fled south along the Nile and subsequently migrated north into the levant.

    Reply
  2. Ernest Porter

    I received my y-700 results but they don’t tell me what I needed to know ……I need to know how to calculate or convert R-FT373601 to the R1b******** sequence if it’s possible from that FT #….any suggestions would be helpful

    Reply
  3. houston junk car buyer

    I am not sure where you are getting your info, but good topic.
    I needs to spend some time learning more or understanding more.
    Thanks for great info I was looking for this info for my mission.

    Reply

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